[Exclusive] Tammy Gibson, The Sankofa TravelHer

Tammy Gibson onsite of a plantation with the Slave Dwelling Project.

Tammy Gibson onsite of a plantation with the Slave Dwelling Project.

As we all know February marks the celebration of Black history month and what a wonderful month it has been. I say this because I've learned a lot from my family, my supporters and The colleagues that I work with on the daily. Black history is something that we all should know about if you ask me, but it's also important to know the origins of our Black history.

Today I will be talking about Tammy Gibson an African-American historian who dedicates her time to learning the lost history of blacks and the mistreatment they endured during the era of slavery.

Tammy graduated from Chicago State University in the focus of African American Studies. She has slept in more than a dozen slave cabins on actual slave plantations by way of the "Slave Dwelling Project" founded by Historian Joseph McGill as apart of her research. (Yeah that's what you call field research.) On some of these plantation sites the organizers of these tours would lead excavation workshops for the students or other historians to participate in. During the scavenger hunts Tammy's finds would include jewelry worn by slaves utensils and often times animal bones.

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Now that she's back from her travels she uses the knowledge that she's gained in the classroom and plantation sites to spread awareness about blacks and the hardships they endured. She leads workshops where she herself and will dress in the garments of slaves and give in depth explanations as to what certain Food, Laws and essential living items that were existent during that time. I myself have had the luxury of participating in a few of her exhibits and I can truly say I've learned a lot more about the things that went on during that time. Below you will be able to go through the gallery of photos gathered from her journeys and my visit. It's also cool to note that Tammy is my beautiful mother and I'm extremely proud of the strides she's taken to spread black knowledge. Not only to the youth, but the unknowing as well about some areas of black history that aren't entirely covered in schools. Check it out below. 

slave collar used on captured slaves to prevent future runaways.

slave collar used on captured slaves to prevent future runaways.